Thursday, August 17, 2006

painting tomatoes...again?

I know, I know. How can he paint another tomato? It's summer, I have ten thousand tomatoes growing in my garden. What else can I do?
Cezanne-ish beginning.
However, this one just flopped. Not to worry though....


One of the benefits of still life painting... sometimes you get to eat the props.
I began again. I think a better composition this time, it tells a story.
The painting gods were playing with me again. You know how books always say how a north window gives such even light.? Don't believe everything you read in art magazines! Check this photo to the previous one. My soft light has vanished. This is a demonstration in how powerful clouds can reflect sunlight. Even through a northlight window.Young & Old
5"x7"
oil on canvas panel
I like the pairing with the new smoother tomato. Here is my big ugly german heirloom tomato again this time with a beautiful round, perfectly smooth, bush tomato. I love growing different variety's. I should paint an outdoor picture of the German tomato vine. It is as mis-shapened a plant as it's fruit. But a lot of fun.
Lesson of the day: I think Composition is 90% of a successful painting. A painting can't tell it's story if the composition fails to support it.

6 comments:

Lisa said...

Beautiful paintings! I would love put your link on my blog.

www.touchofcolor.blogspot.com

Let me know if this is ok?

Lisa said...

Peter,

In your last comment although Heather is a nice name, my name is Lisa, hehe.

ParisBreakfasts said...

I really like the way yr site looks these days Peter!
Carolg

Darren Maurer said...

I need some of those German tomato seeds to try out next year. I'm a huge tomto fan as you know and you have told me how great they are. Nice painting also. I like the contrast between the two types of tomatoes.

Lisa Hunter said...

Thanks for sharing your process. The remark about having so many tomatoes reminded me of the story about how Matisse painted his early still lives of tropical fruit: He was in Paris in the winter, and fruit was so expensive (he wasn't rich then) that he turned the heat off in his apartment and painted in an overcoat and gloves so the fruit wouldn't rot before he could finish his painting.

Much better to paint plentiful summer tomatoes!

Luis Colan said...

I love tomatoes...keep painting more. Take care

Luis