Monday, June 04, 2007

daily painting practice - everybody goes through a slump

Everyone goes through a slump. Baseball players that are paid millions of dollars a year do it. Moms that don't get paid anything do it. CEO's, writers, sales people, students, even industries go through slumps. So it should be no surprise that artists can go through a period where things just don't flow.
I can say this now because I feel I have just gone through one. I define an art slump as an emotional disconnect from the creative process. Here are the danger signs of going into an art slump.

1. You begin to talk to yourself, doubting your ability
2. You begin to worry what others think about your art
3. You are not enjoying the process, instead you are thinking about results.


Peony Study
8"x10"
oil on masonite

This painting is not one of my best works. It is a practice piece and I love it because I had fun painting it. The best way to end an art slump you ask?

1. Be grateful - Gratitude propels all things forward!
2. Enjoy the process, results are the gifts others bring to you not what you bring to them.
3. Keep repeating 1 and 2.

There is a reason we all enjoy art. What is yours?

4 comments:

Cara Dawn Romero said...

Peter,

Thanks for the words of wisdom. You're right, we all have those days when it just doesn't flow.

I love this painting, and I know what you mean. I too have a few pieces that are far from great but I love.

Nina Warner said...

I love your peonies always....

You express the joyfulness of that
beauty. Thank you!

Nina

Mike said...

Hey Peter!

Wow! Are you ever right about slumps . . .and the solution.

When the cylindars aren't firing in the painting, maybe we just need a rest. A creative spirit dies when we are emotionally tired.

You still astound me with the long string of work you have posted over time!

Hang in!
Mike

Mark said...

I'd just like to say thank you for giving me some peace of mind tonight.

Been in SEVERAL bouts of slumps recently, and began losing my marbles.

Kudos for confirming my suspicions on the symptoms and most importantly, the solutions.