Wednesday, June 06, 2007

Daily Painting Practice - Study study study

A quick sketch in charcoal to place the composition. These are more flowers from Saturdays Farmer's market. I think I should get an artist discount the next time I go there. ( by the way... the grapes are plastic... sssshhhh! don't tell)

I think I read someplace recently that values are more important than color. I tend to agree with that. I would add to it though. Values are more important than detail.
Here's a better look at the block in of lights and darks. I left a lot of the pre-toned orange panel poking through. It helps tie the colors together.
click on the picture to enlarge the image

Color Study
8"x10"
oil on masonite

This is a study for a larger studio piece. These still life studies always seem to have more expression than my more finished or more detailed daily paintings. I think that spontaneity has its own song in paint. Being more spontaneous with the brush can make the painting be more engaging to the viewer also. I think it's the freedom of the brush strokes that leaves the viewer more space to enter the picture and more time to use their imagination.

Helping people use their imaginations ( especially in today's world) is one of the magical gifts art brings to the world.

4 comments:

Cara Dawn Romero said...

Peter - I couldn't agree more. I know my biggest weakness is that I tend to tickle my paintings to death. I'm trying to learn to break that pattern.

silvina said...

I appreciate seeing your process. I'm working on something difficult right now and have lost that spontaneous look I wanted. I think I'm using too much medium which is causing every brush stroke to blend seamlessly. Very nice still life.

Anonymous said...

Peter,

I'm so glad you are out of your slump and back to your daily work. I can feel your inspiration and energy. That in itself is a gift, let alone the beauty of your work.

Lizzy

Mike said...

Peter . .

I can't miss a day without 'checking in' on you. You have great energy and perseverance. That's what it takes . . . so I'm told. ;-)

Mike